NEW

A Parent's Guide to Your Baby's Brain (published by Cradlewise)

For Educators

When I teach courses on psychology and child development, I'm often frustrated by the lack of diversity in our field's representation of important theories. So my colleagues and I wrote a paper adapting Bronfenbrenner's bioecological model to center Black girls.

 

Then something cool happened: Ind, a UK-based artist and psychology trainee, reached out to create an illustrated version of the model. We hope that educators use this beautiful image in their courses, research talks, and lectures, so that more students will see themselves in this work.

When using the image, please cite the paper (Stern, Barbarin, & Cassidy, 2021) and credit the artist, @clinpsych_ind

 

For Students

For undergraduate and graduate students navigating the road to a degree in psychology, there can be plenty of challenges and a "hidden curriculum" of unspoken expectations in higher education (Calarco, 2020; Margolis, 2001). PsychResearchList (created by my wonderful colleague, Dr. Meltem Yucel), aims to make psychology more transparent and accessible. They offer lists of paid internships, virtual graduate school information sessions, post-baccalaureate jobs, resources for applying to graduate school, and a lecture exchange.

Many of my students are interested in becoming therapists (fantastic!), and some choose to apply to graduate school in Clinical Psychology and related disciplines (a daunting process — so ask for help!). If you're a student at any stage of the application process, this "uncensored" advice from Dr. Mitch Prinstein, Professor of Clinical Psychology, is one of the most honest and comprehensive guides around.

If you're a student (or professional at any stage of your career), setting goals and managing your time are key. Many colleagues swear by the Life On Track (LOT) Planner, created by Dr. Sa-kiera Hudson when she was a graduate  student. LOT is a combination journal, planner, and tracker, with tools "to help you think about the big picture for your life and then to break down that picture into manageable chunks."

For Parents

One of the most powerful parenting programs I can recommend is Circle of Security. If you're struggling to connect with your child or to manage difficult behavior, Circle of Security offers programs and resources for parents, grounded in decades of scientific research on child development. I have attended the Circle of Security — Parenting educator training and conducted research to see first-hand how the program helps children and caregivers.

With my colleague, Rachel Samson (an Australia-based family therapist), we weave personal and professional experience with the latest research on parenting in our blog for Psychology Today, "The Heart and Science of Attachment." You can read about the gift of deep listening and how both kindness and trauma are passed from generation to generation.

If you are a parent raising a highly sensitive child, I highly recommend following psychologist Rachel Samson for wisdom about parenting, child development, and the trait of high sensitivity. She shares professional insights, personal stories, and helpful quotes at the Sensitivity Project on Facebook and @australianpsychologist on Instagram.

 
 

"If a community values its children

it must cherish their parents"

-John Bowlby

Photo by John David
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